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WISE survey uncovers millions of black holes


 

WISE survey uncovers millions of black holes

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With its all-sky infrared survey, NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, has identified millions of quasar candidates. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA

(Phys.org)—NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission has led to a bonanza of newfound supermassive black holes and extreme galaxies called hot DOGs, or dust-obscured galaxies.

Images from the telescope have revealed millions of dusty black hole candidates across the universe and about 1,000 even dustier objects thought to be among the brightest ever found. These powerful galaxies, which burn brightly with infrared light, are nicknamed .

“WISE has exposed a menagerie of hidden objects,” said Hashima Hasan, WISE program scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “We’ve found an asteroid dancing ahead of Earth in its orbit, the coldest star-like orbs known and now, supermassive black holes and galaxies hiding behind cloaks of dust.”

WISE scanned the whole sky twice in infrared light, completing its survey in early 2011. Like night-vision goggles probing the dark, the telescope captured millions of images of the sky. All the data from the mission have been released publicly, allowing astronomers to dig in and make .

Read more: http://phys.org/news/2012-08-wise-survey-uncovers-millions-black.html

 

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WISE Captures a Nebula on Fire

July 8, 2012 1 comment

Sunday July 8, 2012

The 'Flame' Burns Bright in New WISE Image 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Flame Nebula sits on the eastern hip of Orion the Hunter, a constellation most easily visible in the northern hemisphere during winter evenings. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

(Phys.org) — A new image from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, shows the candle-like Flame nebula lighting up a cavern of dust. The Flame nebula is part of the Orion complex, a turbulent star-forming area located near the constellation’s star-studded belt.

The image is being released today along with a new batch of data from the mission. Last March, WISE released its all-sky catalog and atlas containing  and data on more than a half billion objects, including everything from asteroids to . Now, the mission is offering up additional data from its second scan of the sky.

“If you’re an astronomer, then you’ll probably be in hog heaven when it comes to,” said Edward (Ned) Wright of UCLA, the principal investigator of the WISE mission. “Data from the second sky scan are useful for studying stars that vary or move over time, and for improving and checking data from the first scan.”

Read more: http://phys.org/news/2012-07-flame-bright-wise-image.html