Archive

Posts Tagged ‘space’

NASA Rover Confirms First Drilled Mars Rock Sample

February 26, 2013 Leave a comment

Feb. 20, 2013 — NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has relayed new images that confirm it has successfully obtained the first sample ever collected from the interior of a rock on another planet. No rover has ever drilled into a rock beyond Earth and collected a sample from its interior.

First Curiosity Drilling Sample in the Scoop: This image from NASA’s Curiosity rover shows the first sample of powdered rock extracted by the rover’s drill. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
 

Transfer of the powdered-rock sample into an open scoop was visible for the first time in images received Wednesday at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

“Seeing the powder from the drill in the scoop allows us to verify for the first time the drill collected a sample as it bore into the rock,” said JPL’s Scott McCloskey, drill systems engineer for Curiosity. “Many of us have been working toward this day for years. Getting final confirmation of successful drilling is incredibly gratifying. For the sampling team, this is the equivalent of the landing team going crazy after the successful touchdown.”

The drill on Curiosity’s robotic arm took in the powder as it bored a 2.5-inch (6.4-centimeter) hole into a target on flat Martian bedrock on Feb. 8. The rover team plans to have Curiosity sieve the sample and deliver portions of it to analytical instruments inside the rover.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130220161133.htm

NASA | SDO’s Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit

February 13, 2013 Leave a comment

Mars Orbiter Reveals Evidence Of Underground Lakes – And Possibly Life

January 22, 2013 Leave a comment

A new photograph of Mars suggests that huge lakes of liquid water might lie underneath the Red Planet’s surface.

The find has raised hopes that life may have once existed on the planet – and might even still be there.

Nasa said that the image “adds to an increasingly complex picture” of our nearest neighbouring planet.

Researchers analysed data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft as it looked down on the floor of the McLaughlin Crater, which is 57 miles in diameter and over 1.4 miles deep.

The picture showed that the crater was once deep enough to let underground water flow into its interior.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/01/21/mars-orbiter-reveals-lakes_n_2518459.html?icid=maing-grid7|uk-bb|dl11|sec1_lnk2%26pLid%3D147443

There is no spoon


Never-Before-Seen Stage of Planet Birth Revealed


by Nola Taylor Redd, SPACE.com Contributor
Date: 02 January 2013 Time: 01:00 PM ET
 ALMA observations of planet-forming bridge

Observations made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope of the disc of gas and cosmic dust around the young star HD 142527, showing vast streams of gas flowing across the gap in the disc. These are the first direct observations of these streams.
CREDIT: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), S. Casassus et al.

 
  Astronomers studying a newborn star have caught a detailed glimpse of planets forming around it, revealing a never-before seen stage of planetary evolution.

Large gas giant planets appear to be clearing a gap in the disk of material surrounding the star, and using gravity to channel material across the gap to the interior, helping the star to grow. Theoretical simulations have predicted such bridges between outer and inner portions of disks surrounding stars, but none have been directly observed until now.

Read more: http://www.space.com/19100-alien-planet-birth-alma-telescope.html

Largest Quasar Ever Discovered Burns 100 Times Brighter Than Entire Milky Way

November 29, 2012 Leave a comment

By Emily Elert Posted 11.28.2012
 
Glowing galactic center located near a supermassive black hole
Artist's Rendering of Huge Quasar Outflow

Artist’s Rendering of Huge Quasar Outflow ESO/L. Calçada

Astronomers have found a galaxy whose super-luminous nucleus–called a quasar–is burning 100 times as much energy as the entire Milky Way galaxy.

Though theory has long predicted that quasars this powerful should exist, the newly-discovered object, known as SDSS J1106+1939, is by far the most energetic ever observed. The quasar is powered by a supermassive black hole that lies at its center.

Read more: http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-11/scientists-discover-biggest-quasar-ever-near-supermassive-black-hole

Planck spots hot gas bridging galaxy cluster pair

November 22, 2012 1 comment

Planck spots hot gas bridging galaxy cluster pair

 
Galaxy clusters connected by gas bridge

 20 November 2012
ESA’s Planck space telescope has made the first conclusive detection of a bridge of hot gas connecting a pair of galaxy clusters across 10 million light-years of intergalactic space.
 
Planck’s primary task is to capture the most ancient light of the cosmos, the Cosmic Microwave Background, or CMB. As this faint light traverses the Universe, it encounters different types of structure including galaxies and galaxy clusters – assemblies of hundreds to thousands of galaxies bound together by gravity.

If the CMB light interacts with the hot gas permeating these huge cosmic structures, its energy distribution is modified in a characteristic way, a phenomenon known as the Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ) effect, after the scientists who discovered it.

This effect has already been used by Planck to detect galaxy clusters themselves, but it also provides a way to detect faint filaments of gas that might connect one cluster to another.

In the early Universe, filaments of gaseous matter pervaded the cosmos in a giant web, with clusters eventually forming in the densest nodes.

Much of this tenuous, filamentary gas remains undetected, but astronomers expect that it could most likely be found between interacting galaxy clusters, where the filaments are compressed and heated up, making them easier to spot.

 Read more: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Planck/SEMRT791M9H_0.html