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Posts Tagged ‘Private’

DNA of Thousands of Innocent People Still Being Collected by Police


Thursday, 07 June 2012

‘Privacy campaigners say the system remains “illiberal and uncertain” and accuse ministers of failing to ensure that the genetic fingerprints of those cleared of suspicion are removed from files.

Big Brother Watch also estimates it could cost forces up to £8million to sift through their records and remove DNA taken from people who were arrested but never convicted of crimes.

The warnings come despite the recent passage of the Protection of Freedoms Act, which was meant to scale down the biggest database of DNA profiles in the world, which has grown by almost 1m records since 2009.’

Read more: DNA of Thousands of Innocent People Still Being Collected by Police

http://www.davidicke.com/headlines

The US Military Wants To ‘Microchip’ Troops


Monday, 07 May 2012

‘DARPA is at it again. This time, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has announced plans to create nanochips for monitoring troops health on the battlefield.

Kate Knibbs at Mobiledia reports the sensors are targeted at preventing illness and disease, the two causes of most troops medical evacuations. What seems like a simple way of cutting costs and increasing efficiency has some people concerned that this is the first step in a “computer chips for all” scenario.

Bob Unruh at WND reports one of those opponents, Katherine Albrecht, co-author of Spychips says “It’s never going to happen that the government at gunpoint says, ‘You’re going to have a tracking chip. It’s always in incremental steps. If you can put a microchip in someone that doesn’t track them … everybody looks and says, ‘Come on, it’ll be interesting seeing where we go.’”’

Read more: The US Military Wants To ‘Microchip’ Troops

http://www.davidicke.com/headlines/

US Military-Industrial Giant KBR in Bidding to Privatize British Police Forces


Friday, 04 May 2012

‘Giant US military-industrial company Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) is in the running to win a slice of a controversial £1.5 billion (US$2.43 billion) contract to transform the West Midlands and Surrey police forces in Britain, The (London) Times reported.

Hailed as the largest police privatization scheme in the UK, it has been suggested the private companies who win the contract will be tasked to perform several police functions — including patrols, detention and criminal investigation.

KBR, a former subsidiary of the Halliburton group, has attracted its share of criticism over the large contracts it won with the US government during the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. The corporation also helped to build the Guantanamo Bay detention facility.’

Read more: US Military-Industrial Giant KBR in Bidding to Privatize British Police Forces

Lincolnshire UK – Say Hello To Your Corporate Police


Wednesday, 25 April 2012 09:33

‘Police staff throughout the county of Lincolnshire are now proudly wearing the logo of their corporate bosses, as Government cutbacks force the privatization of the nation’s peacekeepers.

G4S, a controversial multi-national security corporation has now virtually taken over all civilian positions in the region, including front counter staff at police stations, control room operators, custodians at local holding cells, and even inquiry officers.

In total 550 employees who previously worked for Lincolnshire Police Authority are now considered private sector workers, essentially accountable only to company policy, with 200 or so already sporting the G4S stamp.’

Read more: Lincolnshire UK – Say Hello To Your Corporate Police

http://www.davidicke.com/headlines

Bankers Built Private Empires on Public Credit


Wednesday, 06 July 2011 10:40

‘As you have a doctorate degree in economics from a great university I will touch as lightly as my verbosity allows on facts accepted by economic “science” and proceed to occult aspects of Central Banking.

Since the division of labor is the key to all human achievement and satisfaction, a system of exchange is crucial. Barter is hopelessly complicated. A command economy, in which each does and receives what he is told, is also hopelessly cumbersome and fails to take advantage of individual initiative, ability, and concrete knowledge.

A medium of exchange, money, is the obvious solution. (Even our highly centralized economies on the socialist model now enthusiastically embrace money as an indispensable simplifying tool in their economic planning.)’

Read more: Bankers Built Private Empires on Public Credit