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Posts Tagged ‘physics’

NASA Rover Confirms First Drilled Mars Rock Sample

February 26, 2013 Leave a comment

Feb. 20, 2013 — NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has relayed new images that confirm it has successfully obtained the first sample ever collected from the interior of a rock on another planet. No rover has ever drilled into a rock beyond Earth and collected a sample from its interior.

First Curiosity Drilling Sample in the Scoop: This image from NASA’s Curiosity rover shows the first sample of powdered rock extracted by the rover’s drill. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
 

Transfer of the powdered-rock sample into an open scoop was visible for the first time in images received Wednesday at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

“Seeing the powder from the drill in the scoop allows us to verify for the first time the drill collected a sample as it bore into the rock,” said JPL’s Scott McCloskey, drill systems engineer for Curiosity. “Many of us have been working toward this day for years. Getting final confirmation of successful drilling is incredibly gratifying. For the sampling team, this is the equivalent of the landing team going crazy after the successful touchdown.”

The drill on Curiosity’s robotic arm took in the powder as it bored a 2.5-inch (6.4-centimeter) hole into a target on flat Martian bedrock on Feb. 8. The rover team plans to have Curiosity sieve the sample and deliver portions of it to analytical instruments inside the rover.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130220161133.htm

Mars Orbiter Reveals Evidence Of Underground Lakes – And Possibly Life

January 22, 2013 Leave a comment

A new photograph of Mars suggests that huge lakes of liquid water might lie underneath the Red Planet’s surface.

The find has raised hopes that life may have once existed on the planet – and might even still be there.

Nasa said that the image “adds to an increasingly complex picture” of our nearest neighbouring planet.

Researchers analysed data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft as it looked down on the floor of the McLaughlin Crater, which is 57 miles in diameter and over 1.4 miles deep.

The picture showed that the crater was once deep enough to let underground water flow into its interior.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/01/21/mars-orbiter-reveals-lakes_n_2518459.html?icid=maing-grid7|uk-bb|dl11|sec1_lnk2%26pLid%3D147443

There is no spoon


Never-Before-Seen Stage of Planet Birth Revealed


by Nola Taylor Redd, SPACE.com Contributor
Date: 02 January 2013 Time: 01:00 PM ET
 ALMA observations of planet-forming bridge

Observations made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope of the disc of gas and cosmic dust around the young star HD 142527, showing vast streams of gas flowing across the gap in the disc. These are the first direct observations of these streams.
CREDIT: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), S. Casassus et al.

 
  Astronomers studying a newborn star have caught a detailed glimpse of planets forming around it, revealing a never-before seen stage of planetary evolution.

Large gas giant planets appear to be clearing a gap in the disk of material surrounding the star, and using gravity to channel material across the gap to the interior, helping the star to grow. Theoretical simulations have predicted such bridges between outer and inner portions of disks surrounding stars, but none have been directly observed until now.

Read more: http://www.space.com/19100-alien-planet-birth-alma-telescope.html

NASA locates most distant galaxy ever discovered

November 19, 2012 Leave a comment

The most distant galaxy ever seen in the universe has been detected by NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes.

The most distant galaxy ever seen in the universe has been detected by NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes.

The newly discovered galaxy, named MACS0647-JD, is very young and only a tiny fraction of the size of our Milky Way Photo: Nasa

By , Science Correspondent

11:58AM GMT 16 Nov 2012

Light from the newly discovered galaxy, which astronomers have named MACS0647-JD, reached Earth after travelling across space for 13.3 billion years.

It provides a window on what the galaxy looked like just 420 million years after the big bang, when the universe was only three per cent of its current age.

The galaxy was detected using an effect known as gravitational lensing, where large clusters of galaxies are used as “natural zoom lenses” to enlarge the appearance of galaxies behind them.

Astronomers were able to detect a hint of light from MACS0647-JD because it was magnified as it passed around an enormous galaxy cluster known as MACS J0647+7015 as it travelled towards Earth.

Thanks to the gravitational force of the cluster, the Hubble telescope was able to detect the light at up to eight times the brightness it otherwise would.

Read more: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/9682959/NASA-locates-most-distant-galaxy-ever-discovered.html

 

Gravitational lens magnifies earliest galaxy yet seen

November 17, 2012 Leave a comment

by  – Nov 17 2012, 8:45pm GTBST

Small galaxy was producing stars only 425 million years after the Big Bang.

 

The contours of the gravitational lens (colored lines) along with the three images of the distant background galaxy (JD1-3).

The Universe’s first galaxies played a key role in shaping the environment in which we now find ourselves. They fostered the formation of the first stars, which died in spectacular explosions that enabled a new generation of smaller stars, orbited by rockier planets. And the galaxies themselves merged and grew, forming the large galaxies and clusters that populate the Universe today. But, despite their critical role in shaping the Universe, we’ve never actually been able to see one of them.

Slowly, that’s changing. The Hubble Deep Field exposures have helped us spot galaxies from the Universe’s early days. But now, a special Hubble project has used an intervening cluster of galaxies as a lens to spot what appears to be the most distant galaxy ever imaged, one that dates from just 425 million years after the Big Bang.

Since it takes light time to reach us from distant corners of the Universe, the further you look, the older the objects you see. The wavelength of the light also gets shifted towards the red by the expansion of the Universe, which stretches it out as it travels. As you get closer to the Big Bang, light that started out in the UV end of the spectrum gets pushed deeper and deeper into the infrared. To make these galaxies even harder to spot, the extreme distance means that very few photons actually make their way to Earth, so these objects are incredibly dim.

Read more: http://arstechnica.com/science/2012/11/gravitational-lens-magnifies-earliest-galaxy-yet-seen/

 

Looking Beyond Space and Time to Cope With Quantum Theory

October 29, 2012 Leave a comment

ScienceDaily (Oct. 28, 2012) — Physicists have proposed an experiment that could force us to make a choice between extremes to describe the behaviour of the Universe.

Trying to explain quantum “spooky action at a distance” using any kind of signal pits Einstein’s relativity against our concept of a smooth spacetime. (Credit: Timothy Yeo / CQT, National University of Singapore)
 

The proposal comes from an international team of researchers from Switzerland, Belgium, Spain and Singapore, and is published October 28 in Nature Physics. It is based on what the researchers call a ‘hidden influence inequality’. This exposes how quantum predictions challenge our best understanding about the nature of space and time, Einstein’s theory of relativity.

“We are interested in whether we can explain the funky phenomena we observe without sacrificing our sense of things happening smoothly in space and time,” says Jean-Daniel Bancal, one of the researchers behind the new result, who carried out the research at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. He is now at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore.

Excitingly, there is a real prospect of performing this test.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121028142217.htm