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Posts Tagged ‘meteorite’

Meteor plunges into ocean lighting up Perth sky


July 2, 2012
 
Fire in the skyMETEORIC SNAP: A photo of the meteor over Cottesloe taken by PerthNow reader Gavin Trought just before sunset. Source: PerthNow
 
Meteor in Perth skyAMAZING VIEWS: This picture was posted to Twitter by Pip Moir. She wrote ” Very bizarre. View from cott. Looks like fire. What is that?!?” Source: PerthNow

THIS fiery streak in the sky amazed Perth beachgoers at sunset as a suspected meteor plunged into the ocean off the WA coast.

PerthNow reader Gavin Trought snapped the ‘fire in the sky’ as it appeared over Cottesloe just before sunset on Friday, with remnants of the phenomenon still visible in the sky this afternoon.

“The weird streak in the sky as seen from Cottesloe last night. I noticed it just before sunset,” he told us.

Perth journalist Pip Moir also posted the photo she took at Cottesloe Beach to Twitter shortly after 6pm as puzzled onlookers debated what caused the colourful phenomena.

Read more : http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/top-stories/meteor-plunges-into-ocean-lighting-up-perth-sky/story-e6frg12l-1226413309565

Scientists Find New Primitive Mineral in Meteorite


ScienceDaily (June 26, 2012) — In 1969, an exploding fireball tore through the sky over Mexico, scattering thousands of pieces of meteorite across the state of Chihuahua. More than 40 years later, the Allende meteorite is still serving the scientific community as a rich source of information about the early stages of our solar system’s evolution. Recently, scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) discovered a new mineral embedded in the space rock — one they believe to be among the oldest minerals formed in the solar system.

Panguite is embedded in a piece of the Allende meteorite. (Credit: Chi Ma / Caltech)
 

Dubbed panguite, the new titanium oxide is named after Pan Gu, the giant from ancient Chinese mythology who established the world by separating yin from yang to create the earth and the sky. The mineral and the mineral name have been approved by the International Mineralogical Association’s Commission on New Minerals, Nomenclature and Classification. A paper outlining the discovery and the properties of this new mineral will be published in the July issue of the journal American Mineralogist, and is available online now.

“Panguite is an especially exciting discovery since it is not only a new mineral, but also a material previously unknown to science,” says Chi Ma, a senior scientist and director of the Geological and Planetary Sciences division’s Analytical Facility at Caltech and corresponding author on the paper.

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120626131907.htm#

Out of this world, quite literally: The beautiful and mysterious Fukang meteorite


By LYLE BRENNAN

PUBLISHED: 15:45 GMT, 14 April 2012 | UPDATED: 15:45 GMT, 14 April 2012
When it slammed into the surface of Earth, there was little sign of the beauty that lay inside.

But cutting the Fukang meteorite open yielded a breathtaking sight.

Within the rock, translucent golden crystals of a mineral called olivine gleamed among a silvery honeycomb of nickel-iron.


Cosmic wonder: Marvin Killgore of the Arizona Meteorite Laboratory lets the sun shine through a polished slice of the Fukang rock

The rare meteorite weighed about the same as a hatchback when it was discovered in 2000, in the Gobi Desert in China’s Xinjiang Province.

It has since been divided into slices which give the effect of stained glass when the sun shines through them.

An anonymous collector holds the largest portion, which weighs 925lb. in 2008, this piece was expected to fetch $2million (£1.26million) at auction at Bonham’s in New York – but it remained unsold.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2129747/The-beautiful-mysterious-Fukang-pallasite-meteorite.html#ixzz1xxGEGnk3