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Posts Tagged ‘Dementia’

Bees Can ‘Turn Back Time,’ Reverse Brain Aging

July 4, 2012 3 comments

July 4, 2012

ScienceDaily (July 3, 2012) — Scientists at Arizona State University have discovered that older honey bees effectively reverse brain aging when they take on nest responsibilities typically handled by much younger bees. While current research on human age-related dementia focuses on potential new drug treatments, researchers say these findings suggest that social interventions may be used to slow or treat age-related dementia.

Old bees collect nectar and pollen. Most bees start doing this job when they are 3-4 weeks old, and after that they age very quickly. Their bodies and wings become worn and they loose the ability to learn new things. Most food collector bees die after about 10 days. (Credit: Christofer Bang)
 

In a study published in the scientific journal Experimental Gerontology, a team of scientists from ASU and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences, led by Gro Amdam, an associate professor in ASU’s School of Life Sciences, presented findings that show that tricking older, foraging bees into doing social tasks inside the nest causes changes in the molecular structure of their brains.

“We knew from previous research that when bees stay in the nest and take care of larvae — the bee babies — they remain mentally competent for as long as we observe them,” said Amdam. “However, after a period of nursing, bees fly out gathering food and begin aging very quickly. After just two weeks, foraging bees have worn wings, hairless bodies, and more importantly, lose brain function — basically measured as the ability to learn new things. We wanted to find out if there was plasticity in this aging pattern so we asked the question, ‘What would happen if we asked the foraging bees to take care of larval babies again?”

Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120703172547.htm

Tied to Chairs, Sedated or Locked Up, the Ordeal Faced by Thousands With Dementia

July 22, 2011 5 comments

Thursday, 21 July 2011 14:52

‘Thousands of restraining orders are being taken out on dementia patients and the alarming practice appears to be increasing, official figures have revealed.

Hospital and care home staff are routinely isolating frail, confused patients to prevent them wandering around and coming to harm. This can include locking residents in their rooms overnight, sedating them or even tying them to chairs – all of which, critics said, denies them their basic human rights.’

Read more: Tied to Chairs, Sedated or Locked Up, the Ordeal Faced by Thousands With Dementia